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1.
Memonautica
Martin Pogačar, 2011, doctoral dissertation

Found in: osebi
Keywords: spomin, zgodovina, digitalna okolja, Jugoslavija
Published: 15.10.2013; Views: 2372; Downloads: 57
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2.
Can agreement with the linearly closest conjunct be derived in syntax proper?
Andrew Nevins, Boban Arsenijević, Jana Willer Gold, Franc Marušič, 2015, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Abstract: The recent literature on South Slavic conjunct agreement can be roughly divided into two camps: those trying to model the cases of agreement with linearly closest conjunct, as in the Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) example in (1) (taken from Bošković 2009), within syntax (Bošković 2009, Puškar & Murphy 2015 a.o.) and those claiming this agreement is a result of a postsyntactic operation that occurs after linearization and hence is sensitive to the linear distance between two syntactic elements (among these, Bhatt & Walkow 2013, Marušič et al 2015). We present a strong argument against strictly syntactic theories of conjunct agreement that leverages experimental work on BCS conjunct agreement and builds on data in Aljović & Begović (2015).
Found in: osebi
Keywords: verb agreement, conjunct agreement, experimental syntax, Slovenian
Published: 21.03.2016; Views: 1432; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (127,43 KB)

3.
4.
Elided Clausal Conjunction Is Not the Only Source of Closest‐Conjunct Agreement: A Picture‐Matching Study
Branimir Stanković, Anita Peti-Stantić, Ivana Mitić, Petra Mišmaš, Nataša Milićević, Tanja Milićev, Franc Marušič, Frane Malenica, Nedžad Leko, Marijana Kresić, Nermina Čordalija, Nadira Aljović, Jana Willer-Gold, Boban Arsenijević, Jelena Tušek, Andrew Nevins, 2019, original scientific article

Abstract: A recurring hypothesis about the agreement phenomena generalized as closest‐conjunct agreement takes this pattern to result from reduced clausal conjunction, simply displaying the agreement of the verb with the nonconjoined subject of the clause whose content survives ellipsis (Aoun, Benmamoun & Sportiche 1994, 1999; see also Wilder 1997). Closest‐conjunct agreement is the dominant agreement pattern in the South Slavic languages Slovenian and Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian. A natural question is whether closest‐conjunct agreement in these varieties may indeed be analyzed as entirely derived from conjunction reduction. In this article, we report on two experiments conducted to test this. The results reject the hypothesis as far as these languages are concerned, thereby upholding the relevance of models developed to account for closest‐conjunct agreement within theories of agreement.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Conjunct agreement, Clausal conjunction, Experimental syntax
Published: 08.04.2019; Views: 1361; Downloads: 26
.pdf Fulltext (653,34 KB)

5.
Distributed agreement in participial sandwiched configurations
Andrew Nevins, Franc Marušič, 2020, independent scientific component part or a chapter in a monograph

Abstract: In recent years, several proposals have appeared that try to model the patterns of agreement with coordinate noun phrases found in South Slavic Languages. We investigate agreement in so-called sandwiched configurations, whereby a coordinated noun phrase sits between two agreeing participles. In such cases, the two participles do not necessarily agree with each other, given a scenario in which the first and the second conjunct have different phi-features. This means the two participles choose their target of agreement independently. We argue the results of our experimental study favor an approach to agreement that places it partially in PF.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Syntax, Agreement, Coordination, sandwiched agreement
Published: 26.02.2020; Views: 15; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (427,78 KB)

6.
Trace detection of C2H2 in ambient air using continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy combined with sample pre-concentration
Orr-Ewing Andrew, Damien Martin, Iain White, Roberto Grilli, Ruth Lindley, Manik Pradhan, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: Continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) coupled with sample pre-concentration has been used to measure acetylene (C2H2) mixing ratios in ambient air. Measurements were made in the near-infrared region (λ∼1535.393 nm), using the P(17) rotational line of the (ν1+ν3) vibrational combination band, a region free from interference by overlapping spectral absorption features of other air constituents. The spectrometer is shown to be capable of fast, quantitative and precise C2H2 mixing ratio determinations without the need for gas chromatographic (GC) separation. The current detection limit of the spectrometer following sample pre-concentration is estimated to be 35 parts per trillion by volume (pptv), which is sufficient for direct atmospheric detection of C2H2 at concentrations typical of both urban and rural environments. The CRDS apparatus performance was compared with an instrument using GC separation and flame ionization detection (GC-FID); both techniques were used to analyze air samples collected within and outside the laboratory. These measurements were shown to be in quantitative agreement. The indoor air sample was found to contain C2H2 at a mixing ratio of 3.87±0.22 ppbv (3.90±0.23 ppbv by GC-FID), and the C2H2 fractions in the outside air samples collected on two separate days from urban locations were 1.83±0.20 and 0.69±0.14 ppbv (1.18±0.09 and 0.60±0.04 ppbv by GC-FID). The discrepancy in the first outdoor air sample is attributed to degradation over a 2-month interval between the cw-CRDS and GC-FID analyses.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Rotational Line, Cavity Enhance Absorption Spectroscopy, Adsorbent Trap, Trace Atmospheric Constituent, CRDS Instrument
Published: 15.07.2019; Views: 316; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (363,50 KB)

7.
Distribution of gaseous and particulate organic composition during dark α-pinene ozonolysis
Marie Camredon, Jacqueline F Hamilton, Mohammed S Alam, Kevin P Wyche, Timo Carr, Iain R White, Paul S Monks, Andrew R Rickard, William J Bloss, 2010, original scientific article

Abstract: Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) affects atmospheric composition, air quality and radiative transfer, however major difficulties are encountered in the development of reliable models for SOA formation. Constraints on processes involved in SOA formation can be obtained by interpreting the speciation and evolution of organics in the gaseous and condensed phase simultaneously. In this study we investigate SOA formation from dark α-pinene ozonolysis with particular emphasis upon the mass distribution of gaseous and particulate organic species. A detailed model for SOA formation is compared with the results from experiments performed in the EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE) simulation chamber, including on-line gas-phase composition obtained from Chemical-Ionization-Reaction Time-Of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry measurements, and off-line analysis of SOA samples performed by Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography. The temporal profile of SOA mass concentration is relatively well reproduced by the model. Sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the choice of vapour pressure estimation method, and the potential influence of condensed phase chemistry. Comparisons of the simulated gaseous-and condensed-phase mass distributions with those observed show a generally good agreement. The simulated speciation has been used to (i) propose a chemical structure for the principal gaseous semi-volatile organic compounds and condensed monomer organic species, (ii) provide evidence for the occurrence of recently suggested radical isomerisation channels not included in the basic model, and (iii) explore the possible contribution of a range of accretion reactions occurring in the condensed phase. We find that oligomer formation through esterification reactions gives the best agreement between the observed and simulated mass spectra
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Aerosol, Aerosol formation, Smog chamber
Published: 18.07.2019; Views: 252; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (1,27 MB)

8.
Increased sensitivity in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry by incorporation of a radio frequency ion funnel
Andrew M Ellis, Stephen Mullock, Fraser Reich, Paul S Monks, Iain R White, Robert S Blake, Shane Barber, 2012, original scientific article

Abstract: A drift tube capable of simultaneously functioning as an ion funnel is demonstrated in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for the first time. The ion funnel enables a much higher proportion of ions to exit the drift tube and enter the mass spectrometer than would otherwise be the case. An increase in the detection sensitivity for volatile organic compounds of between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude is delivered, as demonstrated using several compounds. Other aspects of analytical performance explored in this study include the effective E/N (ratio of electric field to number density of the gas) and dynamic range over which the drift tube is operated. The dual-purpose drift tube/ion funnel can be coupled to various types of mass spectrometers to increase the detection sensitivity and may therefore offer considerable benefits in PTR-MS work.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Analytical performance, Detection sensitivity, Drift tube, Dynamic range, Ion funnels, Proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry, Volatile organic compounds
Published: 18.07.2019; Views: 285; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (799,47 KB)

9.
Real-time multi-marker measurement of organic compounds in human breath: Towards fingerprinting breath
Iain R White, Kerry A Willis, Christopher Whyte, Rebecca Cordell, Robert S Blake, Andrew J Wardlaw, 2013, original scientific article

Abstract: The prospects for exploiting proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) in medical diagnostics are illustrated through a series of case studies. Measurements of acetone levels in the breath of 68 healthy people are presented along with a longitudinal study of a single person over a period of 1 month. The median acetone concentration across the population was 484 ppbV with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 1.6, whilst the average GSD during the single subject longtitudinal study was 1.5. An additional case study is presented which highlights the potential of PTR-ToF-MS in pharmacokinetic studies, based upon the analysis of online breath samples of a person following the consumption of ethanol. PTR-ToF-MS comes into its own when information across a wide mass range is required, particularly when such information must be gathered in a short time during a breathing cycle. To illustrate this property, multicomponent breath analysis in a small study of cystic fibrosis patients is detailed, which provides tentative evidence that online PTR-ToF-MS analysis of tidal breath can distinguish between active infection and non-infected patients.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Volatile Organic Compounds, breath, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, Cystic Fibrosis
Published: 22.07.2019; Views: 302; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (1,37 MB)

10.
Metabolite profiling of the ripening of Mangoes Mangifera indica L. cv. ‘Tommy Atkins’ by real-time measurement of volatile organic compounds
Paul S Monks, Andrew J Taylor, Robert S Blake, Iain R White, 2016, original scientific article

Abstract: Real-time profiling of mango ripening based on proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry (PTR–ToF–MS) of small molecular weight volatile organic compounds (VOCs), is demonstrated using headspace measurements of ‘Tommy Atkins’ mangoes. VOC metabolites produced during the ripening process were sampled directly, which enabled simultaneous and rapid detection of a wide range of compounds. Headspace measurements of ‘Keitt’ mangoes were also conducted for comparison. A principle component analysis of the results indicated that several mass channels were not only key to the ripening process but could also be used to distinguish between mango cultivars. The identities of 22 of these channels, tentatively speciated using contemporaneous GC–MS measurements of sorbent tubes, are rationalized through examination of the biochemical pathways that produce volatile flavour components. Results are discussed with relevance to the potential of headspace analysers and electronic noses in future fruit ripening and quality studies.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Mangifera indica, Tommy Atkins, PTR–ToF–MS, VOCs, Ripening, Mango
Published: 18.07.2019; Views: 280; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (1,12 MB)

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