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1.
The excess of phosphorus in soil reduces physiological performances over time but enhances prompt recovery of salt-stressed Arundo donax plants
Cristina Gonnelli, Roberto Tognetti, Mauro Centritto, Francesco Loreto, Cecilia Brunetti, Federico Brilli, Sara Pignattelli, Susanna Pollastri, Claudia Cocozza, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: Arundo donax L. is an invasive grass species with high tolerance to a wide range of environmental stresses. The response of potted A. donax plants to soil stress characterized by prolonged exposure (43 days) to salinity (+Na), to high concentration of phosphorus (+P), and to the combination of high Na and P (+NaP) followed by 14 days of recovery under optimal nutrient solution, was investigated along the entire time-course of the experiment. After an exposure of 43 days, salinity induced a progressive decline in stomatal conductance that hampered A. donax growth through diffusional limitations to photosynthesis and, when combined with high P, reduced the electron transport rate. Isoprene emission from A. donax leaves was stimulated as Na+ concentration raised in leaves. Prolonged growth in P-enriched substrate did not significantly affect A. donax performance, but decreased isoprene emission from leaves. Prolonged exposure of A. donax to + NaP increased the leaf level of H2O2, stimulated the production of carbohydrates, phenylpropanoids, zeaxanthin and increased the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophylls. This might have resulted in a higher stress tolerance that allowed a fast and full recovery following stress relief. Moreover, the high amount of ABA-glucose ester accumulated in leaves of A. donax exposed to + NaP might have favored stomata re-opening further sustaining the observed prompt recovery of photosynthesis. Therefore, prolonged exposure to high P exacerbated the negative effects of salt stress in A. donax plants photosynthetic performances, but enhanced activation of physiological mechanisms that allowed a prompt and full recovery after stress.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Arundo donax Phosphorus Salinity Stress tolerance Biomass production
Published: 20.04.2020; Views: 1193; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (6,60 MB)

2.
Impact of high or low levels of phosphorus and high sodium in soils on productivity and stress tolerance of Arundo donax plants
Claudia Cocozza, Federico Brilli, Laura Miozzi, Sara Pignattelli, Silvia Rotunno, Cecilia Brunetti, Cristiana Giordano, Susanna Pollastri, Mauro Centritto, Gian Paolo Accotto, Roberto Tognetti, Francesco Loreto, 2019, original scientific article

Abstract: The potential of Arundo donax to grow in degraded soils, characterized by excess of salinity (Na+), and phosphorus deficiency (-P) or excess (+P) also coupled with salinity (+NaP), was investigated by combining in vivo plant phenotyping, quantification of metabolites and ultrastructural imaging of leaves with a transcriptome-wide screening. Photosynthesis and growth were impaired by+Na, -P and+NaP. While+Na caused stomatal closure, enhanced biosynthesis of carotenoids, sucrose and isoprene and impaired anatomy of cell walls, +P negatively affected starch production and isoprene emission, and damaged chloroplasts. Finally, +NaP largely inhibited photosynthesis due to stomatal limitations, increased sugar content, induced/repressed a number of genes 10 time higher with respect to+P and+Na, and caused appearance of numerous and large plastoglobules and starch granules in chloroplasts. Our results show that A. donax is sensitive to unbalances of soil ion content, despite activation of defensive mechanisms that enhance plant resilience, growth and biomass production of A. donax under these conditions.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Abiotic stress Giant reed Isoprene emission Phosphorus Salinity Transcriptome
Published: 20.04.2020; Views: 1140; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (10,07 MB)

3.
Silver nanoparticles enter the tree stem faster through leaves than through roots
Claudia Cocozza, Annalisa Perone, Cristiana Giordano, Maria Cristina Salvatici, Sara Pignattelli, Aida Raio, Marcus Schaub, Kruno Sever, John L. Innes, Roberto Tognetti, Paolo Cherubini, 2019, original scientific article

Abstract: A major environmental pollution problem is the release into the atmosphere of particulate matter, including nanoparticles (NPs), which causes serious hazards to human and ecosystem health, particularly in urban areas. However, knowledge about the uptake, translocation and accumulation of NPs in plant tissues is almost completely lacking. The uptake of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and their transport and accumulation in the leaves, stems and roots of three different tree species, downy oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and black poplar (Populus nigra L.), were assessed. In the experiment, Ag- NPs were supplied separately to the leaves (via spraying, the foliar treatment) and roots (via watering, the root treatment) of the three species. Uptake, transport and accumulation of Ag were investigated through spectroscopy. The concentration of Ag in the stem was higher in the foliar than in the root treatment, and in poplar more than in oak and pine. Foliar treatment with Ag-NPs reduced aboveground biomass and stem length in poplars, but not in oaks or pines. Species-specific signals of oxidative stress were observed; foliar treatment of oak caused the accumulation of H2O2 in leaves, and both foliar and root treatments of poplar led to increased O2− in leaves. Ag-NPs affected leaf and root bacteria and fungi; in the case of leaves, foliar treatment reduced bacterial populations in oak and poplar and fungi populations in pine, and in the case of roots, root treatment reduced bacteria and increased fungi in poplar. Species-specific mechanisms of interaction, transport, allocation and storage of NPs in trees were found. We demonstrated definitively that NPs enter into the tree stem through leaves faster than through roots in all of the investigated tree species.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Ag-NPs, pathway of uptake, Pinus sylvestris L., Populus nigra L., Quercus pubescens Willd.
Published: 20.04.2020; Views: 1163; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (971,60 KB)

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