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1.
Extension of the measurement of the proton-air cross section with the Pierre Auger Observatory
Marko Zavrtanik, Danilo Zavrtanik, Lili Yang, Serguei Vorobiov, Darko Veberič, Marta Trini, Samo Stanič, Ahmed Saleh, Gašper Kukec Mezek, Andrej Filipčič, Ralf Ulrich, 2015, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: With hybrid data of the Pierre Auger Observatory it is possible to measure the cross section of proton-air collisions at energies far beyond the reach of the LHC. Since the first measurement by the Pierre Auger Collaboration the event statistics has increased significantly. The proton-air cross section is now estimated in the two energy intervals in lg(E/eV) from 17.8 to 18 and from 18 to 18.5. These energies are chosen so that they maximise the available event statistics and at the same time lie in the region most compatible with a significant primary proton fraction. Of these data, only the 20% of most proton-like events are considered for the measurement. Furthermore, with a new generation of hadronic interaction models which have been tuned to LHC data, the model-dependent uncertainties of the measurement are re-visited.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: Pierre Auger Observatory, extensive air showers, proton-air cross section, hadronic interaction models
Published: 03.03.2016; Views: 1816; Downloads: 120
.pdf Fulltext (114,02 KB)

2.
Particle physics at the Pierre Auger Observatory
Marko Zavrtanik, Danilo Zavrtanik, Serguei Vorobiov, Darko Veberič, Samo Stanič, Ahmed Saleh, Andrej Filipčič, Jan Ebr, 2014, published scientific conference contribution

Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: Pierre Auger Observatory, extensive air showers, hadronic interactions, proton-air cross section
Published: 20.06.2017; Views: 1690; Downloads: 107
.pdf Fulltext (1,02 MB)

3.
Particle Physics with the Pierre Auger Observatory
Marko Zavrtanik, Danilo Zavrtanik, Darko Veberič, Samo Stanič, Andrej Filipčič, Tanguy Pierog, 2014, published scientific conference contribution

Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: Pierre Auger Observatory, extensive air showers, hadronic interactions, proton-air inelastic cross-section
Published: 27.06.2017; Views: 1537; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (4,90 MB)

4.
Effects of alfaxalone or propofol on giant-breed dog neonates viability during elective caesarean sections
Monica Melandri, Tanja Peric, 2019, original scientific article

Abstract: Attention must be paid to C-section anesthesia effects on mother and offspring. Alfaxalone induction results in improved puppy viability when compared to propofol. The present study aims to evaluate effects of alfaxalone or propofol induction for elective C-section on newborns, expressed as Apgar score and fetal fluids cortisol concentration. Anesthesia was induced with alfaxalone 3 mg/kg iv in 5 bitches (group A), and propofol 4 mg/kg iv in another 5 (group P), maintained with isoflurane. Amniotic and allantoic fluids were collected to determine cortisol concentration. Apgar score, litter size, newborn gender, birth-weight, maternal age, and parity were recorded. ANOVA, U Mann-Whitney test and ANCOVA assessed the effects of drugs on the Apgar score and fetal fluids cortisol. Thirty-six puppies were randomly selected for the study: 16 from group A and 20 from group P. Only the Apgar score significantly differed between groups. ANCOVA confirmed a significantly higher Apgar score in group A underlining the influence of fetal fluids cortisol concentrations, both resulting in covariates. Present results confirm the effect of anesthesia on the Apgar score of newborns, which is significantly higher for alfaxalone than propofol, suggesting the use of fetal fluids cortisol as a covariate. These findings could be a starting point for further investigations when less viable puppies are detected or expected, such as during an emergency C-section. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...Attention must be paid to C-section anesthesia effects on mother and offspring. Alfaxalone...
Keywords: Alfaxalone, Apgar score, C-section, Canine neonates, Cortisol, Fetal fluids
Published: 26.11.2019; Views: 509; Downloads: 26
.pdf Fulltext (234,45 KB)

5.
First upper limits on the radar cross section of cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers
J. P. Lundquist, R.U. Abbasi, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: TARA (Telescope Array Radar) is a cosmic ray radar detection experiment colocated with Telescope Array, the conventional surface scintillation detector (SD) and fluorescence telescope detector (FD) near Delta, Utah, U.S.A. The TARA detector combines a 40 kW, 54.1 MHz VHF transmitter and high-gain transmitting antenna which broadcasts the radar carrier over the SD array and within the FD field of view, towards a 250 MS/s DAQ receiver. TARA has been collecting data since 2013 with the primary goal of observing the radar signatures of extensive air showers (EAS). Simulations indicate that echoes are expected to be short in duration (∼ 10 µs) and exhibit rapidly changing frequency, with rates on the order 1 MHz/µs. The EAS radar cross-section (RCS) is currently unknown although it is the subject of over 70 years of speculation. A novel signal search technique is described in which the expected radar echo of a particular air shower is used as a matched filter template and compared to waveforms obtained by triggering the radar DAQ using the Telescope Array fluorescence detector. No evidence for the scattering of radio frequency radiation by EAS is obtained to date. We report the first quantitative RCS upper limits using EAS that triggered the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detector.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: Cosmic ray, Radar, Digital signal processing, Radar cross-section
Published: 27.04.2020; Views: 311; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (6,16 MB)

6.
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