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1.
Can agreement with the linearly closest conjunct be derived in syntax proper?
Andrew Nevins, Boban Arsenijević, Jana Willer Gold, Franc Marušič, 2015, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Abstract: The recent literature on South Slavic conjunct agreement can be roughly divided into two camps: those trying to model the cases of agreement with linearly closest conjunct, as in the Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) example in (1) (taken from Bošković 2009), within syntax (Bošković 2009, Puškar & Murphy 2015 a.o.) and those claiming this agreement is a result of a postsyntactic operation that occurs after linearization and hence is sensitive to the linear distance between two syntactic elements (among these, Bhatt & Walkow 2013, Marušič et al 2015). We present a strong argument against strictly syntactic theories of conjunct agreement that leverages experimental work on BCS conjunct agreement and builds on data in Aljović & Begović (2015).
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: verb agreement, conjunct agreement, experimental syntax, Slovenian
Published: 21.03.2016; Views: 3382; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (127,43 KB)

2.
Surviving sluicing
Tina Šuligoj, Vesna Plesničar, Petra Mišmaš, Franc Marušič, 2016, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...discourse particles, multiple wh-fronting, wh-phrase, left periphery, syntax, Slovenian...
Keywords: sluicing, discourse particles, multiple wh-fronting, wh-phrase, left periphery, syntax, Slovenian
Published: 14.12.2016; Views: 3495; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (382,77 KB)

3.
Formal Studies in Slovenian Syntax
2016, scientific monograph

Abstract: Although in the early days of generative linguistics Slovenian was rarely called on in the development of theoretical models, the attention it gets has subsequently grown, so that by now it has contributed to generative linguistics a fair share of theoretically important data. With 13 chapters that all build on Slovenian data, this book sets a new milestone. The topics discussed in the volume range from Slovenian clitics, which are called on to shed new light on the intriguing Person-Case Constraint and to provide part of the evidence for a new generalization relating the presence of the definite article and Wackernagel clitics, to functional elements such as the future auxiliary and possibility modals, the latter of which are discussed also from the perspective of language change. Even within the relatively well-researched topics like wh-movement, new findings are presented, both in relation to the structure of the left periphery and to the syntax of relative clauses.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: Slovenian, Slavic syntax, syntax, Theoretical linguistics
Published: 12.12.2016; Views: 3381; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (3,74 MB)

4.
Introduction with a State of the Art in Generative Slovenian Syntax
Franc Marušič, Rok Žaucer, 2016, independent scientific component part or a chapter in a monograph

Abstract: Although in the early days of generative linguistics Slovenian was rarely called on in the development of theoretical models, the attention it gets has subsequently grown, so that by now it has contributed to generative linguistics a fair share of theoretically important data. Some of the topics where Slovenian data played a prominent role include the feel-like construction, imperative embedding, closest conjunct agreement phenomena, double applicatives, etc. In this Introduction, we outline some of these topics to demonstrate how Slovenian has been brought to bear on issues in generative syntax, and then briefly introduce individual chapters, some of which touch on the above-mentioned topics and some of which address new topics where Slovenian data prove relevant for the study of a particular linguistic phenomenon, such as relativization, modality, and clitics.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: Generative linguistics, Slovenian, syntax
Published: 12.12.2016; Views: 3210; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (455,90 KB)

5.
The left periphery of multiple wh-questions in Slovenian
Petra Mišmaš, 2016, independent scientific component part or a chapter in a monograph

Abstract: In this paper I focus on multiple wh-questions in Slovenian and argue for an analysis in which wh-phrases move to the extended left periphery of the sentence. Assuming the Cartographic approach, I consider the order of wh-phrases in Slovenian multiple wh-questions, which was previously described as free, e.g. Golden (1997). While I confirm that the order of wh-phrases in the left periphery is generally free, I show that there are some exceptions, e.g. zakaj ‘why’ and kako ‘how’ tend to precede other wh-phrases. In addition, I show that the order of wh-phrases with respect to focus and topic phrases is free, but that one wh-phrase needs to appear in a clause initial position for a question to get a true wh-question reading. Based on this, I propose that the clause initial wh-phrase moves to the Interrogative Projection, in the sense of Rizzi (2001a), and the remaining wh-phrases to Wh-Projections. Crucially, because wh-movement is not restricted by a requirement on chains, cf. Krapova & Cinque (2005), the order of wh-phrases is free.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...wh-questions, multiple wh-fronting, left periphery, syntax, cartography, Slovenian...
Keywords: wh-questions, multiple wh-fronting, left periphery, syntax, cartography, Slovenian
Published: 13.12.2016; Views: 3420; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (338,33 KB)

6.
Something other than wh-words survives sluicing in Slovenian. What else?
Petra Mišmaš, Franc Marušič, Vesna Plesničar, Tina Šuligoj, 2017, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: sluicing, discourse particles, left periphery, Slovenian, syntax
Published: 19.07.2017; Views: 3091; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (236,20 KB)

7.
When clitics don’t climb in Slovenian
Petra Mišmaš, 2017, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...Slovenian, syntax, clitics, clitic climbing, Principle of Distinctness, Spell-Out,...
Keywords: Slovenian, syntax, clitics, clitic climbing, Principle of Distinctness, Spell-Out, grammatical features
Published: 25.09.2017; Views: 2922; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (59,16 KB)

8.
Slovenian questions with short wh-movement and the low periphery
Petra Mišmaš, 2017, original scientific article

Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...phrase, focus phrase, wh-phrase, low periphery Slovenian, syntax, cartography...
Keywords: wh-movement, wh-questions, topic phrase, focus phrase, wh-phrase, low periphery Slovenian, syntax, cartography
Published: 18.10.2017; Views: 2833; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (750,87 KB)

9.
Restricting Left Branch Extraction in Slovenian
Petra Mišmaš, 2017, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: noun phrase, NP, DP, Left Branch Extraction, split DP, Slovenian, syntax
Published: 26.10.2017; Views: 3247; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (323,07 KB)

10.
Two (non-)islands in Slovenian
Manca Mušič, Penka Stateva, Arthur Stepanov, 2018, original scientific article

Abstract: There exists a controversy in the literature and among the speakers of Slovenian concerning the grammaticality of wh-island and subject island constructions in this language. We conducted an acceptability rating study of wh-islands and subject islands in Slovenian, using the factorial definition of island. This definition provides for a possibility to isolate a true island effect while controlling for two complexity factors that potentially interfere in speakers’ evaluation of the relevant sentences: the length of the respective movement dependency and the presence of an island structure itself. We found that (i) Slovenian speakers do judge the wh-island sentences worse than the respective controls, but the observed degradation cannot be attributed to a true island effect; (ii) subject extraction out of a wh-island leads to a so called reverse island effect whereby the acceptability is higher than expected even if the above two complexity factors are taken into consideration; and (iii) speakers are sensitive to the subject island effect, as predicted by the mainstream theories of syntactic locality. The results of our study contribute to establishing a solid empirical base for further theoretical investigations of the island effects and raise new questions about the role of processing factors in speakers’ evaluations of island constructions.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...syntactic island, experimental syntax, Subjacency, Empty Category Principle, Slovenian...
Keywords: syntactic island, experimental syntax, Subjacency, Empty Category Principle, Slovenian
Published: 11.06.2018; Views: 2989; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (607,96 KB)

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