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1.
Sibyl Moholy-Nagy: Architecture, Modernism and Its Discontents
Eszter Polonyi, 2019, review, book review, critique

Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...history, modernism, architectural history, the Bauhaus, pedagogy, gender studies...
Keywords: art history, modernism, architectural history, the Bauhaus, pedagogy, gender studies
Published: 10.12.2020; Views: 709; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (513,81 KB)

2.
Identity politics and the performances of female singers in Niško Polje in the last third of the twentieth century
Ana Hofman, 2007, doctoral dissertation

Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...female singers, stage performance, 20th century, Serbia, gender studies...
Keywords: female singers, stage performance, 20th century, Serbia, gender studies
Published: 19.02.2015; Views: 3172; Downloads: 72
.pdf Fulltext (69,24 MB)
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3.
Pseudopartitives vs. agreement attraction
M. Rita Manzini, Greta Mazzaggio, Ludovico Franco, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: Pseudopartitive constructions are constructions of the form DP-of-NP, where the quantificational, collective or container DP head is interpreted as measuring the embedded NP. A verb can agree either with the head (Head Agreement) or with the embedded NP (Embedded Agreement). We argue that agreement alternations with pseudopartitives form part of lin- guistic competence. Specifically, we account for them in terms of a dual la- belling option open to of -DP/NP constituents, as either PPs (of projecting) or as NPs (of not projecting). Thus, we reject the conclusion that pseudopar- titives are to be accounted for in processing terms, and wholly subsumed un- der agreement attraction. In two studies, we investigate subject-verb num- ber agreement (Study 1, N = 103) and gender agreement (Study 2, N = 87), in an acceptability task with pseudopartitive constructions involving either a collective noun or an approximate quantifier, controlling for the nature of the head. Results show that Italian pseudopartitives allows embedded agree- ment, depending on the speaker and on the nature of the head (quantifiers better than collective Ns).
Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...agreement (Study 1, N = 103) and gender agreement (Study 2, N = 87), in...
Keywords: pseudopartitives, agreement, number, gender, agreement at- traction
Published: 17.09.2021; Views: 108; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (646,12 KB)

4.
Explicit gender stereotyping in bilingualism
Greta Mazzaggio, 2021, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Abstract: A gender stereotype is a mental representation related to gender, according to which certain characteristics are attributed without direct experience (Allport 1954). Many ordinary words present a negative connotation when applied to women compared to men (Lakoff 1973). Do linguistic stimuli influence our bias towards gender stereotypes? We want to exploit the foreign language effect (FLE) to see whether explicit linguistic gender stereotypes are reduced in a second language (L2) compared to a first language (L1). We asked Italian native speakers (213), English native speakers (105) and Italian/English bilinguals (192) to evaluate words as neuter, masculine or feminine. We presented a total of 58 words divided into four categories: 14 Power words vs. 14 Weak words and 15 Warm words vs. 15 Cold words. As expected, overall, participants judged Power words much more masculine than Weak words and Cold words much more masculine than Warm words (Rudman et al. 2001). Running a two-way MANOVA (Group*Gender), there was a statistically significant effect of group for Weak words and of Gender for both Weak words and Warm words. Post-hoc analyses revealed that L2 participants behave differently from the L1 ones, with lower masculine scores for Power words, lower feminine scores for Weak words and Warm words. We demonstrated that when presented with words in a L2 participants are less prone to judge them in a gender-biased way. Our results seem to confirm the FLE: a L2 might trigger cognitive and emotional distance, leading to a lesser gender-biased semantic behavior and language might (mildly) affect how we perceive reality. The take home message is that linguistic behavior might affect our inner beliefs and, thus, how women are represented in everyday language should reflect better equality standards. Gender- free language policies (e.g., gender-neutral language) might be useful in the long run.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: linguistic sexism, gender, stereotype, psycholinguistics, bilingualism
Published: 22.09.2021; Views: 79; Downloads: 11
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