Repository of University of Nova Gorica

Show document
A+ | A- | SLO | ENG

Title:Characterization of lactic bacteria for biogenic amine formation
Authors:Topić, Jelena (Author)
Butinar, Lorena (Author)
Bergant Marušič, Martina (Author)
Korte, Dorota (Author)
Mozetič Vodopivec, Branka (Author)
Files:This document has no files. This document may have a phisical copy in the library of the organization, check the status via COBISS. Link is opened in a new window
Language:Slovenian
Work type:Not categorized (r6)
Tipology:1.16 - Independent Scientific Component Part or a Chapter in a Monograph
Organization:UNG - University of Nova Gorica
Abstract:Biogenic amines are compounds present in many different foods and beverages (wine, beer, dairy products, fermented vegetables and soy products, fish, etc.). Their presence in foodstuff is a result of a microbial action during storage and ageing. The most important are histamine, tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine and tryptamine, which can induce undesirable physiological effects in humans. They are formed through decarboxylation of corresponding amino acids, through the action of enzymes. Consumption of food containing biogenic amines can lead to food poisoning such as histamine poisoning. Histamine, the most studied biogenic amine, is known to cause headaches, oedema, vomiting, etc. [1]–[4]. Monitoring of the content of biogenic amines in foods is of concern for public health in their relation to the food safety, food spoilage and food intolerance. Because microorganisms are used in food productions as starters and biopreservers, characterization of microorganisms for their ability to produce biogenic amines is equally important. Lactic acid bacteria are often used as biopreservers as they can produce antimicrobial metabolites and antifungal peptides. Some strains can also produce undesirable biogenic amines [5]. In order to use lactic acid bacteria as starters or biopreservers, the selection of strains that would not produce biogenic amines is necessary. When considering studies of biogenic amines in foods, focus should be on developing new or improving analysis methods for biogenic amines detection. Secondly, the connections between microorganisms capable of producing biogenic amines and the content of biogenic amines in foods should be investigated [3]. The most widely technique used for quantification of biogenic amines in foodstuff is liquid chromatography, Alternatively to chromatographic techniques, other techniques such as enzymatic biosensors, ELISA and flow-injection analysis have also been employed. Sensors are interesting due to the fact that they do not require special instrumentations, and there is no need for sample clean-up and derivatization, which are the main drawback of chromatographic methods [4]. Detection of biogenic amines producing lactic bacteria is important due to the concerns for public health and there is a need for the early and rapid detection of such microorganisms. Most of the methods that are used for screening involved the measurement of amino acid-decarboxylase activity, although there were been some methods reported that used differential media and pH indicators. Nowadays, molecular methods are replacing culture methods. Molecular approaches are used to determine the presence or absence of genes responsible for biogenic amines formation. The main advantages of DNA hybridization and PCR methods are speed, simplicity, sensitivity and specificity as they allow detection of targeted genes. Culture independent methods which are based on PCR techniques are now regarded as most suitable methods for screening isolates [5]. [1] A. R. Shalaby, “Significance of biogenic amines to food safety and human health,” Food Res. Int., vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 675–690, Oct. 1996. [2] J. M. Landete, S. Ferrer, and I. Pardo, “Biogenic amine production by lactic acid bacteria, acetic bacteria and yeast isolated from wine,” Food Control, vol. 18, pp. 1569–1574, 2007. [3] F. B. Erim, “Recent analytical approaches to the analysis of biogenic amines in food samples,” TrAC - Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol. 52. pp. 239–247, 2013. [4] J. L. Ordóñez, A. M. Troncoso, M. D. C. García-Parrilla, and R. M. Callejón, “Recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages – A review,” Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 939. pp. 10–25, 2016. [5] R. M. Elsanhoty and M. F. Ramadan, “Genetic screening of biogenic amines production capacity from some lactic acid bacteria strains,” Food Control, vol. 68, pp. 220–228, Oct. 2016.
Keywords:lactic bacteria, biogenic amines
Year of publishing:2018
Number of pages:8
COBISS_ID:5292027 Link is opened in a new window
URN:URN:SI:UNG:REP:QUMMMVRI
Views:1766
Downloads:0
Metadata:XML RDF-CHPDL DC-XML DC-RDF
Categories:Document is not linked to any category.
:
  
Average score:(0 votes)
Your score:Voting is allowed only for logged in users.

Hover the mouse pointer over a document title to show the abstract or click on the title to get all document metadata.

Record is a part of a monograph

Title:Understanding Microbial Pathogens: Current knowledge and Educational Ideas on Antimicrobial Research
Subtitle:Microbiology Book Series, Number 7
Publisher:Formatex Research Center
ISBN:13:978-84-947512-5-7
Place of publishing:Badajoz, Španija
Year of publishing:2018
Editors:Enrique Torres-Hergueta, A Mendez-Vilas

Back