Repository of University of Nova Gorica

Search the repository
A+ | A- | Help | SLO | ENG

Query: search in
search in
search in
search in
* old and bolonia study programme

Options:
  Reset


1 - 3 / 3
First pagePrevious page1Next pageLast page
1.
Real-time characterization and source apportionment of fine particulate matter in the Delhi megacity area during late winter
Vipul Lalchandan, Varun Kumar, Anna Tobler, M.T. Navaneeth, Suneeti Mishra, J. G. Slowik, Deepika Bhattu, Pragati Rai, Rangu Satish, Dilip Ganguly, Tiwari Tiwari, Neeraj Rastogi, Tiwari Sashi, Griša Močnik, André S. H. Prévôt, Sachchida Tripathi, 2021, original scientific article

Abstract: National Capital Region (NCR) encompassing New Delhi is one of the most polluted urban metropolitan areas in the world. Real-time chemical characterization of fine particulate matter (PM1 and PM2.5) was carried out using three aerosol mass spectrometers, two aethalometers, and one single particle soot photometer (SP2) at two sites in Delhi (urban) and one site located ~40 km downwind of Delhi, during January-March, 2018. The campaign mean PM2.5 (NR-PM2.5 + BC) concentrations at the two urban sites were 153.8±109.4 μg.m-3 and 127.8±83.2 μg.m-3, respectively, whereas PM1 (NR-PM1 + BC) was 72.3 ± 44.0 μg.m-3 at the downwind site. PM2.5 particles were composed mostly of organics (43-44)% followed by chloride (14-17)%, ammonium (9-11)%, nitrate (9%), sulfate (8-10)%, and black carbon (11-16)%, whereas PM1 particles were composed of 47% organics, 13% sulfate as well as ammonium, 11% nitrate as well as chloride, and 5% black carbon. Organic aerosol (OA) source apportionment was done using positive matrix factorization (PMF), solved using an advanced multi-linear engine (ME-2) model. Highly mass-resolved OA mass spectra at one urban and downwind site were factorized into three primary organic aerosol (POA) factors including one traffic-related and two solid-fuel combustion (SFC), and three oxidized OA (OOA) factors. Whereas unit mass resolution OA at the other urban site was factorized into two POA factors related to traffic and SFC, and one OOA factor. OOA constituted a majority of the total OA mass (45-55)% with maximum contribution during afternoon hours ~(70-80)%. Significant differences in the absolute OOA concentration between the two urban sites indicated the influence of local emissions on the oxidized OA formation. Similar PM chemical composition, diurnal and temporal variations at the three sites suggest similar type of sources affecting the particulate pollution in Delhi and adjoining cities, but variability in mass concentration suggest more local influence than regional.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: source apportionment, air pollution, particulate matter, Delhi
Published: 25.01.2021; Views: 2326; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (2,92 MB)

2.
Equal abundance of summertime natural and wintertime anthropogenic Arctic organic aerosols
Olga Popovicheva, Tuuka Petäjä, Andreas Massling, Jakob K. Nøjgaard, Jean-Luc Jaffrezo, Lin Huang, Heidi Hellén, Hannele Hakola, Wendy Zhang, Mika Vestenius, Henrik Skov, Sangeeta Sharma, Mirko Severi, Jürgen Schnelle-Kreis, Claire E. Moffett, Konstantinos Eleftheriadis, Giulia Calzolai, Silvia Becagli, Wenche Aas, Pragati Rai, Francesco Canonaco, Kaspar R. Daellenbach, Houssni Lamkaddam, Roberto Casotto, Deepika Bhattu, Katja Dzepina, Vaios Moschos, Rebecca J. Sheesley, Rita Traversi, Karl Espen Yttri, Julia Schmale, André S. H. Prévôt, Urs Baltensperger, Imad El Haddad, 2022, original scientific article

Abstract: Aerosols play an important yet uncertain role in modulating the radiation balance of the sensitive Arctic atmosphere. Organic aerosol is one of the most abundant, yet least understood, fractions of the Arctic aerosol mass. Here we use data from eight observatories that represent the entire Arctic to reveal the annual cycles in anthropogenic and biogenic sources of organic aerosol. We show that during winter, the organic aerosol in the Arctic is dominated by anthropogenic emissions, mainly from Eurasia, which consist of both direct combustion emissions and long-range transported, aged pollution. In summer, the decreasing anthropogenic pollution is replaced by natural emissions. These include marine secondary, biogenic secondary and primary biological emissions, which have the potential to be important to Arctic climate by modifying the cloud condensation nuclei properties and acting as ice-nucleating particles. Their source strength or atmospheric processing is sensitive to nutrient availability, solar radiation, temperature and snow cover. Our results provide a comprehensive understanding of the current pan-Arctic organic aerosol, which can be used to support modelling efforts that aim to quantify the climate impacts of emissions in this sensitive region.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Arctic, Organic aerosols, Emission sources, Climate change
Published: 01.03.2022; Views: 501; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (1,89 MB)

3.
Characterization of non-refractory (NR) PM[sub]1 and source apportionment of organic aerosol in Kraków, Poland
Gang Chen, Pragati Rai, Francesco Canonaco, Griša Močnik, Alicja Skiba, Anna Tobler, Jakub Bartyzel, Miroslaw Zimnoch, Katarzyna Styszko, Jaroslaw Nęcki, 2021, original scientific article

Abstract: Kraków is routinely affected by very high air pollution levels, especially during the winter months. Although a lot of effort has been made to characterize ambient aerosol, there is a lack of online and long-term measurements of non-refractory aerosol. Our measurements at the AGH University of Science and Technology provide the online long-term chemical composition of ambient submicron particulate matter (PM1) between January 2018 and April 2019. Here we report the chemical characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol and source apportionment of the organic fraction by positive matrix factorization (PMF). In contrast to other long-term source apportionment studies, we let a small PMF window roll over the dataset instead of performing PMF over the full dataset or on separate seasons. In this way, the seasonal variation in the source profiles can be captured. The uncertainties in the PMF solutions are addressed by the bootstrap resampling strategy and the random a-value approach for constrained factors. We observe clear seasonal patterns in the concentration and composition of PM1, with high concentrations during the winter months and lower concentrations during the summer months. Organics are the dominant species throughout the campaign. Five organic aerosol (OA) factors are resolved, of which three are of a primary nature (hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA) and coal combustion OA (CCOA)) and two are of a secondary nature (more oxidized oxygenated OA (MO-OOA) and less oxidized oxygenated OA (LO-OOA)). While HOA contributes on average 8.6 % ± 2.3 % throughout the campaign, the solid-fuel-combustion-related BBOA and CCOA show a clear seasonal trend with average contributions of 10.4 % ± 2.7 % and 14.1 %, ±2.1 %, respectively. Not only BBOA but also CCOA is associated with residential heating because of the pronounced yearly cycle where the highest contributions are observed during wintertime. Throughout the campaign, the OOA can be separated into MO-OOA and LO-OOA with average contributions of 38.4 % ± 8.4 % and 28.5 % ± 11.2 %, respectively.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: air pollution, PM1, organic aerosol, black carbon, source apportionment, PMF
Published: 08.10.2021; Views: 761; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (1,76 MB)

Search done in 0 sec.
Back to top