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1.
EXPLORING BIODIVERSITY POTENTIAL OF WINE ASSOCIATED YEASTS
Sofia Dashko, 2015, doctoral dissertation

Abstract: Human exploitation of yeast fermentation dates back to the Neolithic. S. cerevisiae has been the most important yeast used for numerous fermentations of biotechnological interest, including grape fermentation for wine production. Despite its abundant use, the molecular mechanisms controlling alcoholic fermentation are rather unclear and the choice of S. cerevisiae as an inoculum is often the consequence of a mere habit, rather than the result of rational analyses. In this work we focused on the role of different yeasts in the winemaking process. I was interested in understanding how the specific strain used for inoculum could influence the wine aroma formation. Furthermore, I wished to investigate the yeast genetics and ecology by characterizing their population and strain diversity in one of the wine regions of Slovenia. To evaluate the effect of the yeast species on the fermentation outcome, we performed successive fermentations with five different species in combination with the industrial strain S. cerevisiae Lalvin T73. The experiment showed that at least two more yeast species, Kazachstania gamospora and Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis have good potential to be applied in the winemaking. , The main conclusions of this study are the possibility of: i) expanding the palette of alternative starters to widen the aromatic components ii) co–fermenting using two different yeast species. Mixed yeast culture fermentations are present in the natural context, but this practice has been neglected in biotechnological processes. Positive results of wine fermentations with non – conventional yeast urged us to explore the diversity of Slovenian wine region natural isolates. The resulting yeast collection counts more than 1200 strains for which phenotype and genotype have been defined. Numerous isolates, including non – Saccharomyces species, showed promising oenological and biotechnological traits because of their capacity of rapid utilization of various carbon sources, growth at low pH and at presence of copper sulfite and potassium metabisulfite. Sampling also revealed sharp discrimination between the ecological niches of S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus, which is a striking feature of European vineyards. While S. cerevisiae habitats are strongly associated with human activity, S. paradoxus was mainly isolated from the forest sources. Profound analysis of the collected data could give some explanations to the driving forces of S. cerevisiae domestication and S. paradoxus geographic isolation population structure.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: Yeasts, biodiversity, molecular biology, alcoholic fermentation
Published: 02.11.2015; Views: 3717; Downloads: 76
.pdf Fulltext (41,27 MB)

2.
Isolation and selection wild yeasts for winemaking
Natalia Mikhaylina, 2017, undergraduate thesis

Abstract: The aim of this study was to explore the diversity of fermentative yeast species in a non-vineyard and vineyard environment, and exploit their oenological potential. For this purpose we collected plant and soil material in the vineyard (located in Črniče in Vipava Valley) planted with Vitis vinifera L. and in the forest (forest in Vipava Old Castle), and by using a selective medium with high ethanol and sugar content we managed to obtain 35 isolates. By sequencing the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA we identified nine different yeast species. The oenological potential of identified yeasts was further investigated by employing a series of tests, such as growth at low pH values, tolerance to ethanol and sulfur, and H2S production ability. Based on the results of these tests we selected four different yeast species for the microvinification of Vitis vinifera L. cv. ‘Pinot Noir’ grape juice. A commercial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Lalvin D47 was also included as a control in the fermentation experiment. Fermentation monitoring was done by measuring daily weight loss and microbiological analysis in the middle of fermentation. For the final wines, sugars were determined and sensorial evaluation performed. Among four tested yeasts, S. paradoxus IVV 32 and Torulaspora delbrueckii IVV 36 appeared to be the most promising for winemaking, but further studies should be carried out.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Summary of found: ...wine, Vitis vinifera L. cv. ‘Pinot Noir’, biodiversity, yeasts, fermentation...
Keywords: wine, Vitis vinifera L. cv. ‘Pinot Noir’, biodiversity, yeasts, fermentation
Published: 10.07.2017; Views: 1715; Downloads: 118
.pdf Fulltext (2,57 MB)

3.
Biodiversity of cider yeasts and their cider-making potential
Lorena Butinar, Branka Mozetič Vodopivec, Melita Sternad Lemut, Eivind Vangdal, 2017, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Abstract: In the area of Hardanger, a part of the fjord region in Western Norway, the production of apple wine (cider) has a long tradition that goes back to the 12th century, when monks introduced apple growing in this area. Nowadays, this is also the main area of fruit production in Norway. Despite the strict regulation of the alcoholic beverage production in Norway, traditional cider is still produced on some farms in this area. By tradition cider is produced by a spontaneous fermentation process of apple juice, performed by naturally occurring indigenous yeasts that originate from the fruit or the surfaces of the processing equipment. Therefore, our aim was primarily to study the ecology and biodiversity of the yeasts associated with the production of traditional cider in the Hardanger area. For two consecutive years, we sampled at 11 different locations in the observed region, where we collected cider samples and surface swabs of processing facilities from the cideries, and also soil and various parts of apple trees in orchards owned by the same producers. Thus, by enriching collected samples with the selective medium with high sugar and ethanol concentration, we managed to isolate about 1,300 yeasts. Based on the multiplex PCR results the yeasts were grouped into the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex and non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The isolates were determined to the species level by performing the restriction analysis of ITS PCR products, and in some cases identifications were confirmed by sequencing of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA and/ or ITS region. As expected, non-Saccharomyces yeasts from the genus Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora mainly populated the orchards, while the Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated in the orchards from the soil and fruits. In contrast, in ciders the species S. uvarum was predominantly found, occasionally also S. cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii and P. membranifacies. Indigenous cider yeasts were further on characterized in micro-plate format for the most important cider-making technological parameters (tolerance to ethanol, SO2, growth at low pH), for the presence of glucoside hydrolase activity, H2S production ability, and assimilation of malic acid. Based on this screenings the micro-scale fermentations of apple juice were performed with 13 different indigenous cider yeasts as monocultures. The most promising indigenous yeasts, T. delbrueckii and S. uvarum, were also tested as mixed cultures in sequential fermentations. Since the tested strain of T. delbrueckii as monoculture was not able to complete the alcoholic fermentation, better results were obtained in sequential fermentation with the mixed culture in combination with S. uvarum.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: indigenous yeasts, biodiversity, spontaneous fermentation, cider-making
Published: 08.11.2017; Views: 1339; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (10,33 MB)

4.
Arthropod biodiversity associated to European sheep grazed pastures
Tanja Peric, Rocio Rosa García, 2019, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Abstract: We analysed the biodiversity of foliage arthropods in nine sheep grazed pasturelands in five European countries. During the maximum flowering period in 2018, entomofauna was collected in 4-6 areas within each pasture, performing 6 transects/area and 25 sweeps per transect. Multivariate analyses tested the differences in total arthropod community composition among degrees of intensification, bioregions and types of pastures. A total of 51,474 arthropods from 3 classes, 17 orders and 95 taxonomical groups were recorded. Univariate analyses revealed that total arthropod abundance was higher in extensive than in intensive systems (P<0.01). It also differed between bioregions (higher in Alpine than in Continental, P<0.05) and between types of pastures (higher in mountain than in lowland pastures where animals are supplemented, P<0.05). Total taxa richness was not influenced by any of the three factors. However, multivariate analyses indicated that community composition differed among intensive and extensive systems, bioregions and types of pastures (P<0.001). The greatest differences occurred between Alpine and Mediterranean (P<0.001), and Mediterranean and Continental pastures (P<0.05), as well as between lowland seminatural and improved pastures (P<0.05), and seminatural and mountain pastures (P<0.001). These results reveal the complex and varied communities associated to the diverse sheep systems and valorise the role of the more extensive, mountain and natural pastures for the conservation of biodiversity in sheep grazed areas.
Found in: ključnih besedah
Keywords: Arthropods, Biodiversity, Sustainability, Management
Published: 25.10.2019; Views: 145; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (1,17 MB)

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