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1.
Treatment strategies targeting persister cell formation in bacterial pathogens
Fazlurrahman Khan, Dung Pham, Nazia Tabassum, Sandra Oloketuyi, Young-Mog Kim, 2020, review article

Abstract: Persister cells are transiently antibiotic-tolerant and dormant subpopulations that are produced to escape the effects of antibiotics within biofilms or planktonic cell populations. Persister cells are of high clinical importance due to their tolerance to antimicrobial agents and subsequent failure in antibiotic treatments. Understanding persister cell formation mechanisms is therefore highly important for developing effective therapeutic strategies against pathogenic bacterial persisters. Several anti-persister compounds have been previously identified via isolation from natural resources or chemical synthesis. Furthermore, a combination of these compounds with antibiotics or non-antibiotic drugs also allows action on multiple targets while reducing the administration frequency. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of the clinical importance and formation mechanisms of persister cells as well as the current treatment strategies against persister cell formations in chronic infections.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Biofilm, anti-persister agents, persister cells, pathogenic bacteria, chronic infections
Published: 14.01.2021; Views: 754; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (3,31 MB)

2.
Molecules involved in motility regulation in Escherichia coli cells: a review
Fazlurrahman Khan, Nazia Tabassum, Dung :Pham, Sandra Oloketuyi, Young-Mog Kim, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: The initial colonization of the host organism by commensal, probiotic, and pathogenic Escherichia coli strains is an important step in the development of infections and biofilms. Sensing and colonization of host cell surfaces are governed by flagellar and fimbriae/pili appendages, respectively. Biofilm formation confers great advantages on pathogenic E. coli cells such as protection against the host immune system, antimicrobial agents, and several environmental stress factors. The transition from planktonic to sessile physiological states involves several signaling cascades and factors responsible for the regulation of flagellar motility in E. coli cells. These regulatory factors have thus become important targets to control pathogenicity. Hence, attenuation of flagellar motility is considered a potential therapy against pathogenic E. coli. The present review describes signaling pathways and proteins involved in direct or indirect regulation of flagellar motility. Furthermore, application strategies for antimotility natural or synthetic compounds are discussed also.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Biofilm formation, Escherichia coli, inhibition, motility, pathogenesis
Published: 14.01.2021; Views: 955; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (2,42 MB)

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