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Morphometry and basic ecological characteristics of dolines in unlogged temperate rainforest karst landscapes of Northern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Carol Ramsey, 2015, doctoral dissertation

Found in: osebi
Published: 29.04.2015; Views: 3526; Downloads: 42
.pdf Fulltext (176,94 MB)
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3.
TD/GC–MS analysis of volatile markers emitted from mono- and co-cultures of Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in artificial sputum
Craig Portsmouth, Pedro Povoa, Jan H Leopold, Pouline M P van Oort, Emili Diaz, Gemma Goma, Timothy Felton, Paul Dark, Alan Davie, Luis Coelho, Lieuwe D Bos, Marta Camprubi, Antonio Artigas, Jonathan Barnard-Smith, Waqar M Ahmed, Stephen J Fowler, Tamara M E Nijsen, Royston Goodacre, Weda Hans, Hugo knobel, Oluwasola Lawal, Iain R White, 2018, original scientific article

Abstract: Introduction: Infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) can be caused by one or more pathogens. Current methods for identifying these pathogenic microbes often require invasive sampling, and can be time consuming, due to the requirement for prolonged cultural enrichment along with selective and differential plating steps. This results in delays in diagnosis which in such critically ill patients can have potentially life-threatening consequences. Therefore, a non-invasive and timely diagnostic method is required. Detection of microbial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath is proposed as an alternative method for identifying these pathogens and may distinguish between mono- and poly-microbial infections. Objectives: To investigate volatile metabolites that discriminate between bacterial mono- and co-cultures. Methods: VAP-associated pathogens Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured individually and together in artificial sputum medium for 24 h and their headspace was analysed for potential discriminatory VOCs by thermal desorption gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results: Of the 70 VOCs putatively identified, 23 were found to significantly increase during bacterial culture (i.e. likely to be released during metabolism) and 13 decreased (i.e. likely consumed during metabolism). The other VOCs showed no transformation (similar concentrations observed as in the medium). Bacteria-specific VOCs including 2-methyl-1-propanol, 2-phenylethanol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol were observed in the headspace of axenic cultures of E. cloacae, and methyl 2-ethylhexanoate in the headspace of P. aeruginosa cultures which is novel to this investigation. Previously reported VOCs 1-undecene and pyrrole were also detected. The metabolites 2-methylbutyl acetate and methyl 2-methylbutyrate, which are reported to exhibit antimicrobial activity, were elevated in co-culture only. Conclusion: The observed VOCs were able to differentiate axenic and co-cultures. Validation of these markers in exhaled breath specimens could prove useful for timely pathogen identification and infection type diagnosis.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Bacteria, Enterobacter cloacae, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Volatile organic compounds
Published: 18.07.2019; Views: 1125; Downloads: 51
.pdf Fulltext (1,29 MB)

4.
Detection and quantification of exhaled volatile organic compounds in mechanically ventilated patients–comparison of two sampling methods
Iain R. White, Pouline M. van Oort, Waqar Ahmed, Craig Johnson, Jonathan Bannard-Smith, Timothy Felton, Lieuwe D. Bos, Royston Goodacre, Paul Dark, Stephen J. Fowler, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: Exhaled breath analysis is a promising new diagnostic tool, but currently no standardised method for sampling is available in mechanically ventilated patients. We compared two breath sampling methods, first using an artificial ventilator circuit, then in “real life” in mechanically ventilated patients on the intensive care unit. In the laboratory circuit, a 24-component synthetic-breath volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture was injected into the system as air was sampled: (A) through a port on the exhalation limb of the circuit and (B) through a closed endo-bronchial suction catheter. Sorbent tubes were used to collect samples for analysis by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Realistic mechanical ventilation rates and breath pressure–volume loops were established and method detection limits (MDLs) were calculated for all VOCs. Higher yields of VOCs were retrieved using the closed suction catheter; however, for several VOCs MDLs were compromised due to the background signal associated with plastic and rubber components in the catheters. Different brands of suction catheter were compared. Exhaled VOC data from 40 patient samples collected at two sites were then used to calculate the proportion of data analysed above the MDL. The relative performance of the two methods differed depending on the VOC under study and both methods showed sensitivity towards different exhaled VOCs. Furthermore, method performance differed depending on recruitment site, as the centres were equipped with different brands of respiratory equipment, an important consideration for the design of multicentre studies investigating exhaled VOCs in mechanically ventilated patients.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: Volatile organic compounds, infection, breath, ventilator associated pneumonia
Published: 10.12.2020; Views: 519; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (1,61 MB)

5.
Detection of particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Mexico City using an aerosol mass spectrometer
Katja Džepina, Janet Arey, Linsey C. Marr, D. Worsnop, Dara Salcedo, Q. Zhang, Timothy B. Onasch, Luisa T. Molina, Mario J. Molina, Jose L. Jimenez, 2007, original scientific article

Abstract: We report the quantification of ambient particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for the first time using a real-time aerosol mass spectrometer. These measurements were carried out during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003) that took place from March 29 to May 4, 2003. This was the first time that two different fast, real-time methods have been used to quantify PAHs alongside traditional filter-based measurements in an extended field campaign. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of PAH detection in ambient air with the Aerodyne AMS equipped with a quadrupole mass analyzer (Q-AMS), on the comparison of PAHs measured by the Q-AMS to those measured with the other two techniques, and on some features of the ambient results. PAHs are very resistant to fragmentation after ionization. Based on laboratory experiments with eight PAH standards, we show that their molecular ions, which for most particulate PAHs in ambient particles are larger than 200 amu, are often the largest peak in their Q-AMS spectra. Q-AMS spectra of PAH are similar to those in the NIST database, albeit with more fragmentation. We have developed a subtraction method that allows the removal of the contribution from non-PAH organics to the ion signals of the PAHs in ambient data. We report the mass concentrations of all individual groups of PAHs with molecular weights of 202, 216, 226 + 228, 240 + 242, 250 + 252, 264 + 266, 276 + 278, 288 + 290, 300 + 302, 316 and 326 + 328, as well as their sum as the total PAH mass concentration. The time series of the Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor (PAS) and Q-AMS PAH measurements during MCMA-2003 are well correlated, with the smallest difference between measured PAH concentrations observed in the mornings when ambient aerosols loadings are dominated by fresh traffic emissions. The Q-AMS PAH measurements are also compared to those from GC–MS analysis of filter samples. Several groups of PAHs show agreement within the uncertainties, while the Q-AMS measurements are larger than the GC–MS ones for several others. In the ambient Q-AMS measurements the presence of ions tentatively attributed to cyclopenta[cd]pyrene and dicyclopentapyrenes causes signals at m/z 226 and 250, which are significantly stronger than the signals in GC–MS analysis of filter samples. This suggests that very labile, but likely toxic, PAHs were present in the MCMA atmosphere that decayed rapidly due to reaction during filter sampling, and this may explain at least some of the differences between the Q-AMS and GC–MS measurements.
Found in: osebi
Keywords: AMS, PAH, Mexico City
Published: 11.04.2021; Views: 221; Downloads: 0
.pdf Fulltext (4,12 MB)

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