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Advantages and disadvantages of Serbian market for exporting “Vinag 1847” wines
Ivana Milivojević, 2023, undergraduate thesis

Abstract: This study investigates the main advantages and disadvantages of the Serbian market as a potential market for the import of Slovenian wines, more specifically, the wines from the wine cellar “Vinag 1847”. Structured interviews were conducted with four participants from different Serbian wine sectors regarding the current wine trends and how the Slovenian wines are presented on the market. Furthermore, the quantitative analysis was performed during the Belgrade Wine Salon in the form of a questionnaire, and it was answered by 60 randomly picked visitors who tasted the wines at the “Vinag 1847” exhibition table. They answered the questions about their personal buying behaviour and evaluated the selected “Vinag 1847” wine offer which was presented at the wine salon. The participants of the quantitative and qualitative analysis have pointed out that Serbian market is expanding, and its wine culture has been evolving, together with the new generations, in new ways. The main advantages are at the same time also the disadvantages of the market which is still in the process of manifestation. With a wide local and regional wine offer and the customer base whose interest in the new wines both from Serbia and abroad has been increasing, Serbia is evaluated as the challenging country for the wine export industry.
Keywords: wine, Serbian market, Vinag 1847, foreign exchange
Published in RUNG: 14.07.2023; Views: 1041; Downloads: 0
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The cultural collaboration between Jacob Grimm and Vuk Karadžić : A fruitful friendship connecting Western Europe to the Balkans
Giustina Selvelli, 2014, other component parts

Abstract: The following article aims at presenting a significant case of intercultural relations between Germany and Serbia that took place during the first half of the 19th Century thanks to the epistolary correspondence between Jacob Grimm and Vuk Karadžić. The German scholar started exploring Serbian language and culture in order to reach a better knowledge of the folk songs Vuk Karadžić was collecting at the time. These songs constituted for Jacob Grimm an essential term of comparison which allowed him to give more concreteness to his theories and researches about “natural language” and encouraged him to explore the field of Indo-European comparative philology. On the other side, Jacob Grimm's support helped Vuk Karadžić in his struggle for the codification of a written language in his country, on the basis of the popular one. The role played by Grimm, together with Goethe, in the diffusion and appreciation of Serbian folk songs is inestimable: thanks to him Western Europe got to know the culture of a part of the continent, towards which prejudices and ignorance were still prevailing. The idea of reciprocal approaching of cultures was also inscribed in Goethe's conception of Weltliteratur, which considered translation as a fundamental part of German culture and the condition for its further growth since Luther's translation of the Bible.
Keywords: Vuk Karadžić, Jacob Grimm, Serbian Folk Songs, Indo-European Philology, Cultural Translation, Weltliteratur
Published in RUNG: 21.09.2020; Views: 2309; Downloads: 0
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Experimenting with Highest Conjunct Agreement under Left Branch Extraction
Boban Arsenijević, Franc Marušič, Jana Willer-Gold, 2020, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: A debate has developed in the recent theoretical and experimental linguistic literature on the status and the locus of conjunct agreement in South Slavic (SS; Marušič et al. 2007, Bošković 2009, Franks & Willer Gold 2014, Murphy & Puškar 2015; Marušič et al. 2015 and Willer Gold et al. 2016). One of the pertinent issues of the debate is the status of Highest Conjunct Agreement – agreement with the hierarchically highest conjunct (NP1) – in sentences with a preverbal subject. The question around which the debate revolves is a basic one: Is there Highest Conjunct Agreement (HCA) in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS), and how is it blocked, or derived, respectively?
Keywords: syntax, agreement, conjunct agrement, left branch extraction, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian
Published in RUNG: 18.05.2020; Views: 3076; Downloads: 0
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Prosody preservation and borrowing verbs as nouns in three systems with lexical prosody
Marko Simonović, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Abstract: The claim by Moravcsik (1975) that “if verbs are borrowed, they seem to be borrowed as if they were nouns” generated a long-standing discussion within language contact research (see e.g. Wohlgemuth 2009 for a recent summary). More precisely, the claim was that “the borrowing language employs its own means of denominal verbalization to turn the borrowed forms into verbs”. This can be interpreted either as a statement about the integration pattern (which may not be mentally represented in monolinguals) or as a claim about the syntactic representation of borrowed verbs in general, whereby borrowed verbs contain an nP embedded under the vP. Both interpretations constitute important hypotheses, which can serve as useful windows into the relation between morphology and phonology. The rst interpretation is compatible with the claim by Simonović (2015) that the integration pattern essentially gets selected by Lexical Conservatism (Steriade 1997): the pattern with most preservation of the properties of the base and least stem allomorphy integrates loanwords. The second interpretation makes important predictions whose implementation is highly dependent on the theory of morphology employed. In this presentation I use a recent elaboration of Distributed Morphology in which the separation between roots and categorial heads is extended to derivational suxes (Lowenstamm 2015) and put it to use in accounting for verb borrowing and denominal verbalisation in three Western South Slavic varieties: Slovenian, Western Serbo-Croatian (henceforth Croatian) and Eastern Serbo-Croatian (henceforth Serbian). All three varieties have lexical prosody. Slovenian has lexically determined stress. In Serbo-Croatian each word has a lexically determined H, and stress assignment follows from its distribution: if the syllable with a H is initial, italso gets stress; if the syllable with a H is non-initial, the stress goes to the preceding syllable, forming a disyllabic rising accent (Zsiga & Zec 2013). Simonović (2018) discusses exceptional preservation of base prosody in Western South Slavic verbs, showing that WSS verbsallow only two prosodic shapes: stress/H stem-nally (1a)and stress/H on the theme vowel (1b), analysed as the contrast between accented and accentless roots. The only verbs which ever display more contrast are borrowed and denominal verbs (2). Since nouns generally allow more prosodic contrast than verbs (Smith 2011), Simonović (2018)argues that verb prosody should be viewed as the regular WSS prosody, whereas all the cases of additional contrast should beanalysed asa consequence of special Faithfulness, and, at least for the classes discussed by Simonović (2018),asingle type of special Faithfulness seems to be sucient: NF Smith 2001). Against the sketched background, variation within WSS is analysed. All three varieties have two patterns for denominal verbs which both allow for exceptional preservation of the base prosody: -a-ti and -ov-a-ti (illustrated in 2a; a isatheme vowel in both cases, ti is the innitive ending). Tellingly, each variety now hasastabilised borrowing pattern in which one of the two suxes is used for English verbs (illustrated in 2b). The necessity ofa denominal verbalisation analysis is relatively limited for Slovenian and Croatian, where a large majority of verbs (but not all) become reanalysable as verbalised accented roots (all the verbs in 3 have a stem-nal stress/H). For Serbian, however, virtually all borrowed verbs from the modern contact with English display the intermediate root -ov-, which makes the denominal verbalisation analysis very attractive. Completing the picture for all three varieties, we turn to older borrowed verbs, especially those from the contact preceding the one with English, in which alarge class of international verbs were integrated and in which no prosodic contrast is instantiated (4). In sum, the deverbal nominalisation analysis seems to beastrong cross-linguistic tendency rather than an absolute rule and its availability depends both on the phonological makeup of the available denominal verbalisation patterns and on the amount of prosodic contrast in the source language. (1) Slovenian Croatian Serbian a. Accented √ gléd-a-ti ‘to look’ gléHd-a-ti ‘to look’ gléHd-a-ti ‘to look’ b. Unaccented √ kop-á-ti ‘to dig’ kóp-aH -ti ‘to dig’ kóp-aH -ti ‘to dig’ (2) Slovenian Croatian Serbian a. Denominal verbs málic-a-ti ‘to snack’ úH žin-a-ti úH žin-a-ti (cf. málica ‘snack’) (cf. úH žin-a ‘snack’) (cf. úH žin-a ‘snack’) vér-ov-a-ti ‘to believe’ vjéH r-ov-a-ti ‘to believe’ v(j)éH r-ov-a-ti ‘to believe’ (cf. vér-a ‘faith’) (cf. vjéH r-a ‘faith’) (cf. v(j)éH r-a ‘faith’) b. Borrowed verbs édit-a-ti ‘to edit’ rikvéH st-a-ti ‘to request’ rikvéH st-ov-a-ti ‘to request’ tríger-a-ti ‘to trigger’ inváH jt-a-ti ‘to invite’ inváH jt-ov-a-ti ‘to invite’ (3) Borrowed verbs which can be reanalysed as verbalised accented root Slovenian Croatian sénd-a-ti ‘to send’ séHnd-a-ti ‘to send’ submít-a-ti ‘to submit’ éHdiH t-a-ti ‘to edit’ (4) International verbs Slovenian Croatian Serbian Innitive asist-ír-a-ti asist-í:r-aH -ti asist-í:r-aH -ti Present.1Pl asist-ír-a-mo asíst-i:H r-a:-mo asíst-i:H r-a:-mo Innitive fotograf-ír-a-ti fotograf-í:r-aH -ti fotográf-iH s-a-ti Present.1Pl fotograf-ír-a-mo fotográf-i:H r-a:-mo fotográf-iH š-e:mo-mo Innitive protest-ír-a-ti protest-í:r-aH -ti próteH st-ov-a-ti Present.1Pl protest-ír-a-mo protést-i:H r-a:-mo próteH st-uj-e:-mo References Lowenstamm, Jean. 2015. Derivational axes as roots: Phasal spell-out meets English stress shift. in Artemis Alexiadou, Hagit Borer,and Florian Schafer (eds.) The syntax of rootsand the roots of syntax, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 230–259. Moravcsik, Edith. 1975. Borrowed verbs. Wiener Linguistische Gazette 8. Simonović, Marko. 2015. Lexicon immigration service - Prolegomena to a theory of loanword integration. (280 p.). LOT Dissertation Series 393. Simonović, Marko. 2018. There is Faith and Faith: Prosodic contrast in Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian verb derivation. Poster presented at the 26th Manchester Phonology Meeting. Smith, Jennifer. 2001. Lexical Category and Phonological Contrast. In R. Kirchner, J. Pater, and W. Wikely (eds.) PETL 6: Proceedings of the Workshop on the Lexicon in Phonetics and Phonology. Edmonton: University of Alberta, 61-72. Smith, Jennifer. 2011. Category-specic eects. In Marc van Oostendorp, Colin Ewen, Beth Hume, and Keren Rice (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Phonology, 2439-2463. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Steriade, Donca. 1997. Lexical Conservatism. In Linguistics in the Morning Calm, Selected Papers from SICOL 1997, 157-179. Hanshin Publishing House Wohlgemuth, Jan. 2009. A typology of verbal borrowings. Berlin; New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Zsiga, Elizabeth C. and Draga Zec. 2013. Contextual evidence for the representation of pitch accents in Standard Serbian. Language and Speech 56;1: 69 – 104.
Keywords: Borrowing, Denominal verbs, Slavic, Slovenian, Serbo-Croatian, Serbian, Croatian
Published in RUNG: 27.11.2018; Views: 3521; Downloads: 0
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