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1.
Speakers' errors in the use of the 'count form' in Bulgarian numeral phrases : possible sources of the distance effect
Penka Stateva, Julie Franck, Arthur Stepanov, 2023, original scientific article

Abstract: In Bulgarian, numerals such as pet ('five') assign a special 'count form' feature to the noun: this assignment takes place across any number of intervening modifier phrases, thus forming a long-distance syntactic dependency. In colloquial speech, speakers often erroneously substitute the count form for regular plurals. Previous corpus and psycholinguistic research established that the ratio of such errors correlates with the distance between numeral and the noun in terms of the number of intervening items. In this note we briefly review this line of inquiry and outline two possible explanations for the distance effect: (i) the cost of maintaining and/or retrieving the numeral in the working memory, and (ii) cumulative activation of the plural markings on the intervening adjectivals.
Keywords: numeral, syntactic dependency, language processing, working memory, activation, Bulgarian
Published in RUNG: 12.02.2024; Views: 722; Downloads: 3
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2.
Scalar diversity and second-language processing: the Pragmatic Transfer Hypothesis
Federica Longo, Bob Van Tiel, Penka Stateva, Greta Mazzaggio, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Abstract: This study investigates the impact of language proficiency on the computation of scalar implicatures (e.g., ”some” implying ”not all”) and compares the Pragmatic Default Hypoth- esis and the Pragmatic Transfer Hypothesis. Six scalar terms were studied among native English speakers, native Slovenian speakers, and Slovenian second-language (L2) learners of English. The findings mostly support the Pragmatic Transfer Hypothesis, as the rate of scalar implicatures in the English-L2 group generally aligned with rates in their native language, Slovenian. This suggests that scalar implicature judgments in one’s L2 reflect pragmatic patterns in one’s first language.
Keywords: Second Language processing, Scalar implicatures, Scalar diversity
Published in RUNG: 03.10.2023; Views: 859; Downloads: 3
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3.
How the lack of negative input affects processing of complex syntax by advanced second language learners
Arthur Stepanov, invited lecture at foreign university

Keywords: Second language learning, ultimate attainment, syntax, sentence processing, negative evidence
Published in RUNG: 18.01.2019; Views: 3764; Downloads: 0
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