Repository of University of Nova Gorica

Search the repository
A+ | A- | Help | SLO | ENG

Query: search in
search in
search in
search in
* old and bologna study programme

Options:
  Reset


1 - 10 / 23
First pagePrevious page123Next pageLast page
1.
Yearlong measurements of monoterpenes and isoprene in a Mediterranean city (Athens) : natural vs anthropogenic origin
Anastasia Panopoulou, Eleni Liakakou, Stéphane Sauvage, Valérie Gros, Nadine Locoge, Iasonas Stavroulas, Bernard Bonsang, Evangelos Gerasopoulos, Nikolaos Mihalopoulos, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: Monoterpenes and isoprene are important constituents of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to their high reactivity and participation in ozone and secondary aerosol formation. The current work focuses on the results of a 13-month intensive campaign of high resolution time-resolved measurements of these compounds, at an urban background site in Athens, Greece. On an annual basis, monoterpenes (α-pinene and limonene) surpass the isoprene levels presenting mean values of 0.70 ± 0.83 μg m−3, 0.33 ± 0.78 μg m−3 and 0.19 ± 0.36 μg m−3, respectively. The large standard deviation highlights the significant diurnal and day-to-day variability. Isoprene presents a typical seasonal cycle, with a photochemically induced summer-time maximum. Enhanced noon levels are observed during summer, whereas a morning peak in the autumn and winter profiles occurs, despite the generally low levels encountered during these seasons. The monoterpenes deviate from the expected biogenic pattern, presenting higher mean levels during the cold period and a night-to-early morning enhancement strongly related to local anthropogenic tracers such as BC, CO, NO or toluene, as well as increased levels under wind speeds lower than 3 m s−1. Estimations of the anthropogenic and biogenic fractions based on the enhancement ratios of α-pinene versus a variety of anthropogenic tracers, demonstrate a clear dominance of the anthropogenic sources in all studied seasons. Simultaneously, the biogenic fraction increased during summer relative to winter by more than 10 times. Both α-pinene and limonene significantly contribute to locally formed secondary organic aerosol (SOA), determined by means of an ACSM, accounting for at least 22% and 13% of their levels in summer and winter respectively. Additionally, monoterpenes and isoprene contribute 6% to the observed oxidants levels (O3 + NOx) during summer.
Keywords: volatile organic compounds, biogenic compounds, monoterpenes, isoprene, Athens
Published in RUNG: 10.05.2024; Views: 300; Downloads: 2
URL Link to file
This document has many files! More...

2.
Exhaled volatile organic compounds and respiratory disease : recent progress and future outlook
Maria Chiara Magnano, Waqar Ahmed, Ran Wang, Martina Bergant Marušič, Stephen J. Fowler, Iain R. White, 2024, review article

Abstract: The theoretical basis of eVOCs as biomarkers for respiratory disease diagnosis is described, followed by a review of the potential biomarkers that have been proposed as targets from in vitro studies. The utility of these targets is then discussed based on comparison with results from clinical breath studies. The current status of breath research is summarised for various diseases, with emphasis placed on quantitative and targeted studies. Potential for bias highlights several important concepts related to standardization, including practices adopted for compound identification, correction for background inspired VOC levels and computation of mixing ratios. The compiled results underline the need for targeted studies across different analytical platforms to understand how sampling and analytical factors impact eVOC quantification. The impact of environmental VOCs as confounders in breath analysis is discussed alongside the potential that eVOCs have as biomarkers of air pollution exposure and future perspectives on clinical breath sampling are provided.
Keywords: breath analysis, disease diagnosis, exhaled volatile organic compounds, respiratory disease, environmental exposure analysis, breath analysis
Published in RUNG: 06.05.2024; Views: 379; Downloads: 3
.pdf Full text (1,36 MB)
This document has many files! More...

3.
Chemical composition of apple cider : a comparative study of Norwegian and French ciders
Ingunn Ovsthus, Mitja Martelanc, Tatjana Radovanović, Marko Lesica, Lorena Butinar, Branka Mozetič Vodopivec, Guillaume Antalick, 2024, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: Norwegian apple ciders have recently gained attention at the levels of international competitiveness. Accordingly, a comparative study on the chemical composition of selected Norwegian and French apple ciders was conducted to gain knowledge on what ubiquitous chemical parameters make the Norwegian ciders different from ciders from well-established producing regions. A total of 43 ciders, 24 Norwegian and 19 French, in the category of acidic dominant ciders, were included in the study. Ethanol, individual sugars and organic acids, pH, total phenols, aroma compounds including esters, C6-alcohols, volatile phenols and terpenoids, were analysed. Norwegian ciders showed higher contents in ethanol, malic and citric acids, whereas total phenols, pH, glucose, and fructose were higher in French counterparts. Regarding the aromatic profile, no significant differences were observed for C6-alcohols. In contrast, differences were more expressed in the case of esters and volatile phenols. Norwegian ciders were characterised by higher average concentration for all the groups of esters, with the most important differences measured for higher alcohol acetates. Norwegian ciders also displayed higher contents of 4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylguaiacol while French ciders contained substantially higher levels of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol. These results are in mutual correlation with the empirical observation reporting Norwegian apple ciders as more acidic, alcoholic and with lighter body but fruitier profile. Whereas French ciders are often perceived with more structure and animalistic profile.
Keywords: alcohol, acidity, total phenols, aroma-compounds, apple cider
Published in RUNG: 25.03.2024; Views: 590; Downloads: 3
URL Link to file
This document has many files! More...

4.
5.
Changes in exhaled volatile organic compounds following indirect bronchial challenge in suspected asthma
Adam Peel, Ran Wang, Waqar Ahmed, Iain R. White, Maxim Wilkinson, Yoon K. Loke, Andrew M. Wilson, Stephen J. Fowler, 2023, original scientific article

Abstract: Background Inhaled mannitol provokes bronchoconstriction via mediators released during osmotic degranulation of inflammatory cells, and, hence represents a useful diagnostic test for asthma and model for acute attacks. We hypothesised that the mannitol challenge would trigger changes in exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs), generating both candidate biomarkers and novel insights into their origin. Methods Participants with a clinical diagnosis of asthma, or undergoing investigation for suspected asthma, were recruited. Inhaled mannitol challenges were performed, followed by a sham challenge after 2 weeks in participants with bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR). VOCs were collected before and after challenges and analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results Forty-six patients (mean (SD) age 52 (16) years) completed a mannitol challenge, of which 16 (35%) were positive, and 15 of these completed a sham challenge. Quantities of 16 of 51 identified VOCs changed following mannitol challenge (p<0.05), of which 11 contributed to a multivariate sparse partial least square discriminative analysis model, with a classification error rate of 13.8%. Five of these 16 VOCs also changed (p<0.05) in quantity following the sham challenge, along with four further VOCs. In patients with BHR to mannitol distinct postchallenge VOC signatures were observed compared with post-sham challenge. Conclusion Inhalation of mannitol was associated with changes in breath VOCs, and in people with BHR resulted in a distinct exhaled breath profile when compared with a sham challenge. These differentially expressed VOCs are likely associated with acute airway inflammation and/or bronchoconstriction and merit further investigation as potential biomarkers in asthma.
Keywords: asthma, exhaled volatile organic compounds, pulmonology, breath metabolomics
Published in RUNG: 31.07.2023; Views: 1138; Downloads: 3
URL Link to file

6.
7.
Untargeted molecular analysis of exhaled breath as a diagnostic test for ventilator-associated lower respiratory tract infections (BreathDx)
Pouline M. van Oort, Tamara M. E. Nijsen, Iain R. White, Hugo Knobel, Timothy Felton, Nicholas J. W. Rattray, Oluwasola Lawal, Murtaza Bulut, Waqar Ahmed, Antonio Artigas, 2021, other scientific articles

Abstract: Patients suspected of ventilator-associated lower respiratory tract infections (VA-LRTIs) commonly receive broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy unnecessarily. We tested whether exhaled breath analysis can discriminate between patients suspected of VA-LRTI with confirmed infection, from patients with negative cultures. Breath from 108 patients suspected of VA-LRTI was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The breath test had a sensitivity of 98% at a specificity of 49%, confirmed with a second analytical method. The breath test had a negative predictive value of 96% and excluded pneumonia in half of the patients with negative cultures. Trial registration number: UKCRN ID number 19086, registered May 2015.
Keywords: ventilator-associated pneumonia, breath analysis, volatile organic compounds, metabolomics, intensive care, hospital acquired infections
Published in RUNG: 07.09.2021; Views: 4403; Downloads: 0
This document has many files! More...

8.
Secondary organic aerosol formation from anthropogenic air pollution : rapid and higher than expected
Rainer Volkamer, Jose L. Jimenez, F. M. San Martini, Katja Džepina, Q. Zhang, Dara Salcedo, Luisa T. Molina, D. Worsnop, 2006, original scientific article

Abstract: The atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban areas results in the formation of 'photochemical smog', including secondary organic aerosol (SOA). State-of-the-art SOA models parameterize the results of simulation chamber experiments that bracket the conditions found in the polluted urban atmosphere. Here we show that in the real urban atmosphere reactive anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs) produce much larger amounts of SOA than these models predict, even shortly after sunrise. Contrary to current belief, a significant fraction of the excess SOA is formed from first-generation AVOC oxidation products. Global models deem AVOCs a very minor contributor to SOA compared to biogenic VOCs (BVOCs). If our results are extrapolated to other urban areas, AVOCs could be responsible for additional 3 - 25 Tg yr(-1) SOA production globally, and cause up to - 0.1 W m(-2) additional top-of-the-atmosphere radiative cooling.
Keywords: atmospheric aerosol, atmospheric chemistry, volatile organic compounds, secondary organic aerosols
Published in RUNG: 12.04.2021; Views: 3415; Downloads: 0
This document has many files! More...

9.
Atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) : a global budget and source attribution
E. V. Fischer, D. J. Jacob, R. M. Yantosca, M. P. Sulprizio, D. B. Millet, Jiandong Mao, F. Paulot, H. B. Singh, A. Roiger, Katja Džepina, 2014, original scientific article

Abstract: Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) is the principal tropospheric reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2). PAN enables the transport and release of NOx to the remote troposphere with major implications for the global distributions of ozone and OH, the main tropospheric oxidants. Simulation of PAN is a challenge for global models because of the dependence of PAN on vertical transport as well as complex and uncertain NMVOC sources and chemistry. Here we use an improved representation of NMVOCs in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and show that it can simulate PAN observations from aircraft campaigns worldwide. The immediate carbonyl precursors for PAN formation include acetaldehyde (44 % of the global source), methylglyoxal (30 %), acetone (7 %), and a suite of other isoprene and terpene oxidation products (19 %). A diversity of NMVOC emissions is responsible for PAN formation globally including isoprene (37 %) and alkanes (14 %). Anthropogenic sources are dominant in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere outside the growing season. Open fires appear to play little role except at high northern latitudes in spring, although results are very sensitive to plume chemistry and plume rise. Lightning NOx is the dominant contributor to the observed PAN maximum in the free troposphere over the South Atlantic.
Keywords: peroxyacetyl nitrate, non-methane volatile organic compounds, global 3-D chemical transport model, GEOS-chem
Published in RUNG: 11.04.2021; Views: 2566; Downloads: 0
This document has many files! More...

10.
The peppermint breath test: a benchmarking protocol for breath sampling and analysis using GC-MS
Maxim Wilkinson, Iain R. White, Katie Hamshere, Olaf Holz, Sven Schuchardt, Francesca G. Bellagambi, Tommaso Lomonaco, Denise Biagini, Laura Di Francesco, Stephen J. Fowler, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: Exhaled breath contains hundreds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which offers the potential for diagnosing and monitoring a wide range of diseases. As the breath research field has grown, sampling and analytical practices have become highly varied between groups. Standardisation would allow meta-analyses of data from multiple studies and greater confidence in published results. The Peppermint Consortium has been formed to address this task of standardisation. In the current study we aimed to generate initial benchmark values for thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) analysis of breath samples containing peppermint-derived VOCs. Headspace analysis of peppermint oil capsules was performed to determine compounds of interest. Ten healthy participants were recruited by three groups. Each participant provided a baseline breath sample prior to taking a peppermint capsule, with further samples collected at 60, 90, 165, 285 and 360 min following ingestion. Sampling and analytical protocols were different for each institution, in line with their usual practice. Samples were analysed by TD-GC-MS and benchmarking values determined for the time taken for detected peppermint VOCs to return to baseline values. Sixteen compounds were identified in the capsule headspace. Additionally, 2,3-dehydro-1,8-cineole was uniquely found in the breath samples, with a washout profile that suggested it was a product of peppermint metabolism. Five compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, eucalyptol, menthol and menthone) were quantified by all three groups. Differences in recovery were observed between the groups, particularly for menthone and menthol. The average time taken for VOCs to return to baseline was selected as the benchmark and were 441, 648, 1736, 643 and 375 min for α-pinene, β-pinene, eucalyptol, menthone and menthol respectively. An initial set of easy-to-measure benchmarking values for assessing the performance of TD-GC-MS systems for the analysis of VOCs in breath is presented. These values will be updated when more groups provide additional data.
Keywords: Volatile organic compounds, breath, diagnostics, standardisation
Published in RUNG: 11.12.2020; Views: 3265; Downloads: 0
This document has many files! More...

Search done in 0.06 sec.
Back to top