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Title:Year-long measurements of C1-C3 halocarbons at an urban site and their relationship with meteorological parameters
Authors:ID Khan, M Anwar K, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID Mead, M Iqbal, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID White, Iain R., School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID Golledge, Ben, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID Nickless, Graham, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID Knights, Alan, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID Martin, Damien, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID Rivett, Alison C, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID Greally, Brian G R, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
ID Shallcross, Dudley E, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom (Author)
Files: This document has no files that are freely available to the public. This document may have a physical copy in the library of the organization, check the status via COBISS. Link is opened in a new window
Language:English
Work type:Not categorized
Typology:1.01 - Original Scientific Article
Organization:UNG - University of Nova Gorica
Abstract:The mixing ratios of 11 C1–C3 halocarbons have been measured using a GC–twin‐linked ECD system over the period from October 2004 to December 2005 at an urban site in Bristol, UK. Time series and seasonal variations of the halocarbons were analysed over the period to determine biogenic and anthropogenic sources and sinks. Correlations between the target halocarbons were also observed, suggesting common sources within the area. Wind rose plots for all halocarbons have been used to assist in the determination of halocarbons sources. Halocarbon concentrations are highest at low‐wind speeds and decrease as wind speed increases, a few species (CCl4 and CH3Cl most notably) rise at very high‐wind speeds suggesting release from the Bristol Channel.
Keywords:adsorption–desorption system, anthropogenic halocarbons, biogenic halocarbons, electron capture detector, gas chromatography, methyl bromide
Year of publishing:2009
Number of pages:75-86
Numbering:10, 2
PID:20.500.12556/RUNG-4631-ebfa7912-3562-e260-0eb2-f0735b9a0901 New window
COBISS.SI-ID:5417211 New window
DOI:10.1002/asl.213 New window
NUK URN:URN:SI:UNG:REP:PGVFD3TP
Publication date in RUNG:18.07.2019
Views:3030
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Record is a part of a journal

Title:Atmospheric Science Letters
Shortened title:Atmos. Sci. Lett.
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
Year of publishing:2009
ISSN:1530261X

Licences

License:CC BY-SA 4.0, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International
Link:http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/
Description:This Creative Commons license is very similar to the regular Attribution license, but requires the release of all derivative works under this same license.
Licensing start date:17.07.2019

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