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Title:Microbial volatiles as diagnostic biomarkers of bacterial lung infection in mechanically ventilated patients
Authors:ID Ahmed, Waqar M, Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, UK (Author)
ID Fenn, Dominic, Department of respiratory medicine, Amsterdam UMC location AMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Author)
ID White, Iain R., Laboratory for Environmental and Life Science, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica, Slovenia (Author)
ID Dixon, Breanna, Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, UK (Author)
ID Nijsen, Tamara M E, Philips Research, Philips B.V., Eindhoven, the Netherlands (Author)
ID Knobel, Hugo H, Eurofins Materials Science Netherlands BV, High Tech Campus, Eindhoven, the Netherlands (Author)
ID Brinkman, Paul, Department of respiratory medicine, Amsterdam UMC location AMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Author)
ID van Oort, Pouline M P, Department of Anaesthesiology, Amsterdam UMC location VUmc, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Author)
ID Schultz, Marcus J, Intensive Care, Amsterdam UMC location AMC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Author)
ID Dark, Paul, Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, UK (Author)
ID Goodacre, Royston, Centre for Metabolomics Research, Department of Biochemistry and Systems Biology, Institute of Systems, Molecular and Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK (Author)
ID Felton, Timothy, Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, UK (Author)
ID Bos, Lieuwe D J, Department of respiratory medicine, Amsterdam UMC location AMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Author)
ID Fowler, Stephen J., Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, UK (Author)
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Language:English
Work type:Not categorized
Typology:1.01 - Original Scientific Article
Organization:UNG - University of Nova Gorica
Abstract:Background Early and accurate recognition of respiratory pathogens is crucial to prevent increased risk of mortality in critically ill patients. Microbial-derived volatile organic compounds (mVOCs) in exhaled breath could be used as non-invasive biomarkers of infection to support clinical diagnosis. Methods In this study, we investigated the diagnostic potential of in vitro confirmed mVOCs in the exhaled breath of patients under mechanically ventilation from the BreathDx study. Samples were analysed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). Results Pathogens from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures were identified in 45/89 patients and S. aureus was the most commonly identified pathogen (n = 15). Out of 19 mVOCs detected in the in vitro culture headspace of four common respiratory pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli), 14 were found in exhaled breath samples. Higher concentrations of two mVOCs were found in the exhaled breath of patients infected with S. aureus compared to those without (3-methylbutanal p < 0.01. AUROC = 0.81-0.87 and 3-methylbutanoic acid p = 0.01. AUROC = 0.79-0.80). In addition, bacteria identified from BAL cultures which are known to metabolise tryptophan (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca and Haemophilus influenzae) were grouped and found to produce higher concentrations of indole compared to breath samples with culture-negative (p = 0.034) and other pathogen-positive (p = 0.049) samples. Conclusions This study demonstrates the capability of using mVOCs to detect the presence of specific pathogen groups with potential to support clinical diagnosis. Although not all mVOCs were found in patient samples within this small pilot study, further targeted and qualitative investigation is warranted using multi-centre clinical studies.
Keywords:Breath, VOCs, infection, respiratory pathogens, VAP
Publication version:Author Accepted Manuscript
Year of publishing:2022
Number of pages:23
Numbering:ciac859
PID:20.500.12556/RUNG-7758 New window
COBISS.SI-ID:130984195 New window
DOI:10.1093/cid/ciac859 New window
NUK URN:URN:SI:UNG:REP:ZWUI9CG4
Publication date in RUNG:28.11.2022
Views:1363
Downloads:0
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Record is a part of a journal

Title:Clinical Infectious Diseases
Shortened title:Clin. Infect. Dis.
Publisher:Oxford University Press
Year of publishing:2022
ISSN:1058-4838

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License:CC BY-NC-SA 4.0, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International
Link:http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Description:A Creative Commons license that bans commercial use and requires the user to release any modified works under this license.
Licensing start date:27.11.2022

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